Find out your Ancient European Ancestry

Meet your “Ancient” ancestors From 8000 years ago
The report is available for Genomelink users

6 Ancient European populations — the most detailed ever

Discover more about your European ancestry — stretching back thousands of years into the past. (Most reports only go back a few hundred years.)
1 First European farmers
2 Pioneer farmers
3 Maritime farmers
4 Western European Foragers
5 Megalith builders
6 Bronze Age Herder

First European farmers

First European Farmers: The first European farmers migrated from the other side of the Aegean, descended from Anatolians who adopted the agricultural lifestyle over 10,000 years ago. They were a mix of foragers related to Western European hunter-gatherers, and a mysterious population to the south that was more distant to these Pleistocene Europeans than the people of East Asia or Australia were.
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Pioneer farmers

Pioneer Farmers: The pioneer farmers of Northern Europe pushed into startling new landscapes. The crops that they brought were poorly suited to the cold and wet climate, as they were native to the warmer and drier Middle East. While later agriculturalists would spread across the land, the earliest cultivators of Northern Europe concentrated themselves on very fertile strips of land around river valleys, and slowly adapted their crops to the climate. 
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2 / 6

Maritime farmers

Maritime Farmers: These first farmers of the Western Mediterranean encountered a landscape very different from their Northern European cousins. The climate of the Western Mediterranean was different from that of the Eastern Mediterranean, cooler and wetter, but only by degrees. While the indigenous foragers left an imprint on Northern European agriculturalists due to their native population densities, the maritime farming societies almost totally replaced the local hunter-gatherers. 
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3 / 6

Western European Foragers

Western European Foragers: The foragers that occupied the European continent 12,000 years ago with the retreat of the ice sheets were genetically, physically and likely culturally distinct from the later prehistoric societies. Unlike later Europeans they had very dark skin, but they were also blue eyed, meaning that their physical appearance was unlike anything we know today. 
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4 / 6

Megalith builders

Megalith Builders: Stonehenge, Newgrange and the Temples of Malta are all testaments to the Neolithic societies of Europe on the eve of the Bronze Age. The construction of vast Megaliths began in Brittany nearly 6,000 years ago, but spread rapidly north and south along the coasts, from Denmark in the north to Malta in the south, and outward to the British Isles and Ireland. 
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5 / 6

Bronze Age Herder

Bronze Age Herders: The Romans worshiped Jupiter, while the Greeks worshiped Zeus Pater. The similarities between the pantheons were not a coincidence, between 3000 and 2300 BC a massive migration of pastoralists from the Eurasian steppe washed over Europe, from Scandinavia in the north to Iberia in the far southeast. 
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6 / 6
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First European farmers

First European Farmers: The first European farmers migrated from the other side of the Aegean, descended from Anatolians who adopted the agricultural lifestyle over 10,000 years ago. They were a mix of foragers related to Western European hunter-gatherers, and a mysterious population to the south that was more distant to these Pleistocene Europeans than the people of East Asia or Australia were.  
learn more
map
1 / 6
avatar

Pioneer farmers

Pioneer Farmers: The pioneer farmers of Northern Europe pushed into startling new landscapes. The crops that they brought were poorly suited to the cold and wet climate, as they were native to the warmer and drier Middle East. While later agriculturalists would spread across the land, the earliest cultivators of Northern Europe concentrated themselves on very fertile strips of land around river valleys, and slowly adapted their crops to the climate. 
learn more
map
2 / 6
avatar

Maritime farmers

Maritime Farmers: These first farmers of the Western Mediterranean encountered a landscape very different from their Northern European cousins. The climate of the Western Mediterranean was different from that of the Eastern Mediterranean, cooler and wetter, but only by degrees. While the indigenous foragers left an imprint on Northern European agriculturalists due to their native population densities, the maritime farming societies almost totally replaced the local hunter-gatherers. 
learn more
map
3 / 6
avatar

Western European Foragers

Western European Foragers: The foragers that occupied the European continent 12,000 years ago with the retreat of the ice sheets were genetically, physically and likely culturally distinct from the later prehistoric societies. Unlike later Europeans they had very dark skin, but they were also blue eyed, meaning that their physical appearance was unlike anything we know today. 
learn more
map
4 / 6
avatar

Megalith builders

Megalith Builders: Stonehenge, Newgrange and the Temples of Malta are all testaments to the Neolithic societies of Europe on the eve of the Bronze Age. The construction of vast Megaliths began in Brittany nearly 6,000 years ago, but spread rapidly north and south along the coasts, from Denmark in the north to Malta in the south, and outward to the British Isles and Ireland. 
learn more
map
5 / 6
avatar

Bronze Age Herder

Bronze Age Herders: The Romans worshiped Jupiter, while the Greeks worshiped Zeus Pater. The similarities between the pantheons were not a coincidence, between 3000 and 2300 BC a massive migration of pastoralists from the Eurasian steppe washed over Europe, from Scandinavia in the north to Iberia in the far southeast. 
learn more
map
6 / 6

Epochs timeline

In the report, we studied our ancestors from 12000 BC to 2000 BC. Each epoch has its own timeline, and we all might inherit DNA from the people of each epoch.

Sample report

Please check the sample report before purchase. It will help you understand what information you will receive in this report and if it is likely to meet your expectations.
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